Processed our first red wattle pig

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Processed our first red wattle pig
3/10/2014 1:51:53 AM

If you have been following us in our journey as fledgling pig farmers you would know that we started by reaching out to our friends for investments to purchase our first breeding pigs.  With that money and our own we purchased a boar and two sows.  We then also inherited a friends boar and three more sows.  This quickly brought our sounder up to 7 breeding animals.  As soon as the pigs were of age they got right too it and started breeding like rabbits (oddly enough none of our rabbits have made babies yet!!!).  Out of the first batch of piglets, each of our investors was too receive a full size pig (2-300lbs) that they could take to a butcher to be processed as payment for their initial funding.  We also had some friends purchase a baby to be raised out on their property.  This pig great much faster than our other piglets.  And so…it went to processing first!

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Mrs. Porky was raised in a 10 x 20 stall.  She was fed an unending supply of cracked corn, bread, eggs, milk, and various kitchen scraps.  Needless to say she had a very healthy layer of corn based fat built up on her and she grew and grew.  At around 200lbs she was taken to a friend of the owners for an old school processing.

We met the owners of this pig in the morning.  Got her into a large goat cage.  And drove to their friends house.

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As a halter broke pig, she was a very well mannered girl.

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Quite content in her cage she took a little coaxing to get her out.

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We walked her around a bit.  Let her much some grass.  And in general just enjoy life for another 30 minutes or so.  This was also to calm her down as much as possible prior to putting her down.

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Then we walked her next to a tree where she was too be processed.

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Then a 22LR later and she was up in a tree.

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We quickly un-did her skin and started to separate it from the very thick layer of fat she had.

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Once we got the skin down around the neck we took the head off.

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Then we removed her insides.  And cut her in half.

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Then as quickly as possible we got the carcass situated in an ice box to cool her down.

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She barely fit.

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Then came the hams.

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The right tool for the job this time around was a reciprocating saw.

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Too the cooler.

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More ice.

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Silly girl playing with the trotters!

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While this was going on the head was being prepped for head sausage.

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Then we had to take off.  I will get the rest of the pics from this day and post about the fine cuts later.

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